A New Beginning

I’m introducing my new SAL project today. It’s another cross stitch kit and a change of style for me this time. Here it is:

Cover

As you can see from the packet, it’s an Anchor kit of a design called Highlands Landscape. My sister bought it for me for my birthday last year. She likes to keep me out of trouble. I love the picture because the Scottish Highlands is one of my favourite places to visit. I could happily live there but unfortunately the Highland midge finds me far too tasty so that isn’t going to happen!

The design finishes at at 5.5 x 12.5 inches which isn’t huge but it’s full coverage and there’s a lot of confetti stitching as well as blended shades which use two different threads at once.

I’ve enlarged the chart as usual and chopped it up into 21 squares of about 30 x 30 stitches each. I’m going to try and complete 3 of those squares for each SAL update. The top half has hardly any back stitched detail but the foreground has a lot so it could take 8 or more updates to complete.

I started at the top left corner. Some of the stitches are just diagonals and others are full crosses, giving a little bit of texture to the clouds. The photo doesn’t show it very well.

Stage 1

By the time I started the second square I was getting more used to changing from half to full crosses so I didn’t have to unpick as much.

Stage2_thumb.jpg

Here’s the first 3 squares finished.

Stage3_thumb.jpg

It’s been fun to stitch something completely different. I always enjoy the starts and finishes most of all. The biggest challenge this time will be keeping up the pace I’ve set myself. I know I don’t have to finish this much every time but when I set myself a challenge…

Please enjoy the latest SAL project updates from the rest of the group by clicking the links below. Several members are starting or restarting a new SAL project today. I can’t wait to see what they’ve chosen. We live all over the world so you may need to allow for time differences. Posting takes place every third Sunday, local time. Our next updates will be posted on the 5th January 2020. Yes, 2020!!!

Avis, Claire, Gun, Carole, Sue, Constanze, Christina, Kathy, Margaret, Cindy, Linda, Heidi, Jackie, Sunny, Hayley, Megan, Deborah, Mary Margaret, Renee, Jenny, Carmela, Jocelyn, Sharon, Daisy, Anne, Connie

About the SAL

This SAL (Stitch Along) is slightly different to other SALs in that we don’t all stitch the same design at the same rate. We choose ONE unfinished project, or ONE new one, and show progress of its completion over a series of three weekly updates. There are no deadlines and no set amount to stitch. The result is that the space in our drawers full of WIPs (works in progress) is gradually being freed up to store lots of new crafty goodness. It’s surprising how much motivation I’ve gained from being in this SAL. If you’d like to finish a project you’ve left unfinished for a while, or start a new one with us, you can join us by sending me an email. The address is on the right of this page. I’ll send you a few simple rules to agree.

Leave a comment

47 Comments

  1. witchylin

     /  December 15, 2019

    This one is a nice change for you. I like it very much.

    Reply
  2. Avril Baxter

     /  December 15, 2019

    Love the scene. I quite enjoy single and double threads and combining colours and the piece isn’t too large. At the moment my main piece is Sarah Brazier from Hands across the sea samplers and it is huge.

    Reply
  3. claire93

     /  December 15, 2019

    this is a lovely design Avis . . . all those gorgeous purples yet to come ^^

    Reply
  4. I love, love, love, this one Avis. It really is my kind of stitching. I love the idea of cutting your patterns into working pieces and think this is something I may try as even doing one of those 30 x 30 squares each time would give me a realistic time frame. I just need to get my stitching mojo back, or maybe have more holidays as I seem to stitch more when I am away from home lol . xx

    Reply
    • I think I started chopping up charts when I stitched the ABC Bears. It just seemed to make sense to do it that way, one letter at a time. I found I was less distracted if I couldn’t see the other letters as I stitched. I wouldn’t stitch any other way now. Lots of the charts are too small for me these days so it’s easy to enlarge, stick together with sellotape (on the back) and then chop into manageable sections. I like to clip the little chart to the edge of my fabric as well. If it takes more holidays for you to get your stitching mojo back, go for it!

      Reply
  5. It’s lovely, especially the blending of the colours in those hills 🙂

    Reply
  6. Moira

     /  December 15, 2019

    Love this one! And love the idea of enlarging the pattern and “cutting” into smaller units to make stitching easier. I have a couple of patterns from books that I’ve always wanted to make, this might be how they get done.

    Reply
    • Thank you and welcome to the blog. I do all my cross stitching this way now and it works for me. If you do have a go, just fasten your mini chart to the edge of your fabric with a paperclip and away you go :-).

      Reply
  7. It’s a gorgeous piece! I also love the highlands, have only been there once, but my heart is there. 😉

    Reply
    • Thanks! Maybe your ancestors were Scottish. Scotland always feels like home to me 🙂

      Reply
      • Some of them certainly were, though I suspect not as many as family lore would tell you. 🙂

        Reply
        • You might have the same problem as me 🙂 I did some research on my Dad’s side a few years ago. My Grandmother always told everyone she was from the Forest of Dean. Sounds exotic doesn’t it? We all believed her. Turns out she was born just up the road from the rest of us!

          Reply
          • Lol!!! My grandmother always said she was Clan MacDonald, and we have a humorous but healthy outlook when it comes to Campbells as a result. But when Mom and I were in Scotland some years ago, we went to the Clan Donald center on Skye, and there wasn’t a trace of our family name. So if there is a MacDonald connection, it goes back to some woman in the 1800’s or earlier. We didn’t know enough about the family line before then to check it out.

            Reply
            • Tracing family history in Scotland can be tricky prior to 1800. Part of my family was from Fife and I only got as far back as that. It was still very interesting and worthwhile, finding out about the jobs they did etc. I read that records can be unreliable pre 1800 in Scotland because families had to pay fees for baptisms etc. to the kirk and many couldn’t afford it so they didn’t bother. Even for the ones who did get baptised, the person holding the ceremony wasn’t always literate which meant they had to wait until a scribe was available to write up the records. Sometimes they’d wait several days or weeks before doing the records so by that time the details were sometimes forgotten. I hope you can find out more about your family history if you’re interested in doing so.

              Reply
              • That is interesting, I didn’t realize they had to pay for baptism. It’s always about money, isn’t it? I am interested, and hope to have time to really dig into it all someday.

                Reply
  8. This new project looks absolutely wonderful !! Definitely a nice change of style, I personally love mixing full and half crosses, it looks silly at first but when an area is completed it’s like “oh wow, it does give it alot of texture”. Very good going, so much progress already !!! 😀

    Reply
    • Yes, I like the effect of the different stitches and I remember some of the really complex pieces you’ve stitched. I haven’t looked ahead on this chart but I suspect most of the half stitches are in the top half as that’s where the softer shades are.

      Reply
  9. Beautiful, and a great change of pace for you!

    Reply
  10. This is absolutely a gorgeous! The colors in this are amazing and I am excited to see your progress on this. The sky already looks amazing!

    Reply
  11. Beautiful new project ! It has sweet shades of color!
    Carmela

    Reply
    • Thank you Carmela! I’m admiring your finished sampler. It’s beautiful and you completed it so quickly :-). Looking forward to seeing what you choose to do next.

      Reply
  12. This is such a beautiful piece. I love the sheep in the foreground! I can definitely see the texture created by the changing from half to whole cross stitch. It really adds quite a bit to the overall look of the piece.

    Reply
  13. Avis, what a fabulous gift! This is such a beautiful kit and you are off to a lovely start. It will be so much fun to watch it grow!

    Reply
  14. I love this project and the highlands but not the midges. I’ve never cut my projects into workable sections – I just start from the middle and work outwards.

    Reply
  15. Oh, this *will* be a change. It’s going to be beautiful. I admire the way you’ve set out to accomplish the stitching – and the self discipline to carry it out!

    Reply
  16. Christina

     /  December 15, 2019

    Such an exciting project! The colors and stitches are so beautiful already 🙂

    Reply
  17. Wow you got a lot done Avis! We loved Ireland too when we visited this summer.

    Reply
  18. Jocelyn Thurston

     /  December 16, 2019

    Love the look of this design…all those purples…heathers? Also intrigued by your method of sorting before stitching. Sounds like an excellent way to stay on track. Happy Stitching, Avis.

    Reply
    • Yes heathers and some thistles in the foreground as well. I always enlarge the charts, tape them on the back to make one big chart and then chop into manageable chunks. I use a paperclip to fasten the mini chart to the edge of the fabric and away I go 🙂 It works for me.

      Reply
  19. Ah, this is a beautiful embroidery! So sweet of your sister to give you that!

    Reply
  20. Oh that is such a lovely project and you’ve made such a good start. That’s a lot of stitches!

    Reply
  21. Oh Avis, that’s so lovely! My husband and I married at Gretna Green and honeymooned in Scotland, so I really look forward to watching this project grow.

    Reply

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