Garden Shed SAL – Stage 1

This is my first progress update on the Cut Thru Garden Shed cross stitch. Designer credits are here.

For the last couple of kits I’ve stitched, I made a working copy of the chart and then chopped it up into equal sized squares so I can work on one section at a time. I then pin one square of the chart to the fabric and stitch until it’s completed. It’s like having a mini finish when I complete a square and I find it usually motivates me to get more done.

IMG_20180909_124140911_BURST001

When I divided this design up I completely ignored the fact that some squares are fully stitched and others have hardly anything to do. I just took the widest width and height and divided the entire area. I’ve started at the top left so the first section has lots of sky which is unstitched so it doesn’t look like I’ve done very much this time.

Stage 1a

I’ve decided to do the back stitch after each section is completed as it worked well last time and it saves waiting until the end for some of the design details to appear. What a difference it makes! If you need a reminder of how it’ll all turn out in the end, you’ll find a photo in this post.

Stage 1b

I’m really enjoying working with 16 count fabric again. I think it’s probably my favourite size for cross stitching. I’ll be stitching to the right of this part for the next update.

We’ve got a new member to introduce to the SAL from today. Her name is Clare. Welcome aboard Clare!

As usual, it’s worth hopping around the rest of the lovely SAL blogs by clicking the names below. You never know, you might be inspired to make something too. We live all over the world so you may need to allow for time differences. Posting takes place every third Sunday, local time.

Our next updates will be posted on the 11th November 2018.

Avis, Claire, Gun, Carole, LucyAnn, Kate, Jess, Sue, Constanze, Debbierose, Christina, Kathy, Margaret, Cindy, Helen, Steph, Linda, Heidi, Jackie, Sunny, Hayley, Tony, Megan, Catherine, Deborah, Connie, Clare

About the SAL

This SAL (Stitch Along) is slightly different to other SALs in that we don’t all stitch the same design at the same rate. We choose ONE unfinished project, or ONE new one, and show progress of its completion over a series of three weekly updates. There are no deadlines and no set amount to stitch. The result is that the space in our drawers full of WIPs (works in progress) is gradually being freed up to store lots of new crafty goodness. It’s surprising how much motivation I’ve gained from being in this SAL. If you’d like to finish a project you’ve left unfinished for a while, or start a new one with us, you can join us by leaving a request in the comments below or sending me an email. The address is on the right of this page. I’ll send you a few simple rules to agree.

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44 Comments

  1. You’re dead right about the back stitching. It’s gone from “er, what?” to “oh, I see!”. Your way of breaking the chart down is very clever too.

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  2. Breaking down a larger piece into individual sections is a great idea. Looking forward to seeing how this progresses.

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  3. Graphing out and doing the cut up is a wonderful idea. I might try that with a future project that is stitch intense

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  4. I think 16 count is my favourite too, doing back-stitch as you go a long is definitely a good idea. I like the idea of working in blocks, but my brain tends to like seeing a feature finished, rather than a square!

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  5. claire93

     /  October 21, 2018

    I always admire how you resist taking a peak at the next square to finish off a bit of thread lol

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  6. What a clever idea with the pattern, and mini finishes to keep you motivated. I agree with you about 16 count, but I am finding it harder to see it these days.

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  7. Thank you for welcoming me to this SAL.Nice to see I`m not the only one to backstitch as I go when patch says needed. Happy Stitching.

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  8. Glad to see I’m not the only one altering my charts to make them easier to work with. I’m terrible at stitching one multiple pages, so I always scan my chart and turn it into a single seamless chart PDF I then use on my tablet. This allows me to not make any mistakes counting, and also I can highlight what I’ve done, erase, redo, no limitations 😀 – It’s a very nice start, doesn’t matter if some squares are more or less labour intensive, in a way it gives you a sense of achievement and more time between some updates more than others.

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    • That’s a great idea! I do mark my chart copy with a felt tipped pen as I go but highlighting electronically sounds safer. One of these days I’ll draw on the project by mistake!

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  9. I really like your method and will try it on my next project. As of right now, I’m going to finish the section I’m in and then do the backstitching – I think this will make it that much easier to keep my mojo going. Thanks so much for the tips!

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  10. Great start. I totally agree that backstitching as you go is best. It’s fun seeing the bit you’ve just done come to life and it means you don’t have it all to do at the end 🙂

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    • I did the back stitching right at the end for the other two Cut Thru’s and I didn’t mind at all until I saw how another blogger did it. There’s no going back now 🙂

      Reply
  11. I love this piece, and think your method of self motivation is excellent. I may give that a try.

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  12. witchylin

     /  October 21, 2018

    Your latest SAL has me intrigued I’m sure it will be very interesting. Your previous cut throughs are brilliant. I could look at them for ages and find new things in them.

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  13. Sounds like a great plan for a cute project. Hope you don’t get thrown off by those blank spaces (I would!).

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  14. Christina

     /  October 21, 2018

    Thank you for sharing your process! It’s a fantastic idea that I really would love to try! The back stitch really does help the design and colors pop. Looking forward to seeing more 🙂

    Reply
    • If you can resist looking at the other bits of chart it’ll work fine. I was warned that I might get lines due to different tensions between squares but so far that hasn’t happened.

      Reply
      • Christina

         /  October 21, 2018

        That’s what I was wondering. I was working by page on Winnie the Pooh and have lines where I continued color from a different page on a separate occasion. The process is still a great take away!

        Reply
  15. A great start and what a difference the bs makes to this one.

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  16. What a great idea to break the design up into manageable chunks! A lovely start to your next project 😊

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  17. I had to look it up and yes, I remember this beautiful and funny embroidery. You are so smart, dividing your work into pieces and also doing the back stitches at the same time!

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  18. I too have always left the back stitching till the end, so doing it as you go would be good to try. I haven’t tried 16 count, my favourite is 14. As for breaking up the design into manageable chunks, what a great idea. I want to try that!

    Reply
  19. I had been wondering how you had the discipline not to finish up a bit of thread in the next section — but physically cutting up the chart is such a great idea! I always make a photocopy so I can highlight where I have stitched, but I end up folding it and it gets raggedy on the folds. Next time I do a charted design (a.k.a., when I finish the swans!) I’ll try your technique. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  20. Wow the backstitch really does make all the difference! And I love your way of handling cross stitch projects. Not only are they mini finishes for you but they’re great to see for us too!

    Reply

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